TRANSMISSION – THE “GATEWAY” TO INFECTION AND ILLNESS

Direct Contact

Infectious diseases are often spread through direct contact. Types of direct contact include:

PERSON-TO-PERSON CONTACT

Infectious diseases are commonly transmitted through direct person-to-person contact. Transmission occurs when an infected person touches or exchanges body fluids with someone else.

DROPLET SPREAD

Droplets released during coughing and sneezing can spread an infectious disease. You can even infect another person through droplets released when you speak. This type of transmission requires close proximity as the droplets fall to the ground within a few feet. Transmission could then occur when you touch your mouth, nose, or eyes before thoroughly washing your hands.

Indirect Contact

Infectious diseases can also spread indirectly through the air and other mechanisms. For example:

AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION

Some infectious agents can travel long distances and remain suspended in the air for an extended period of time.

CONTAMINATED SURFACES

Infectious organisms can live on most surfaces for a short time. If you touch an object such as a door handle, armrest, or a computer keyboard, soon after an infected person, you might be exposed to infection.

AN IMPERFECT SYSTEM OF HYGIENE

Each transmission risk has associated dual control measures to limit or eliminate the risk of infection.

Except cross-contamination.

The imperfect nature of constant cleaning does not resolve the transmission risks. The risk involved in between scheduled cleans does not address the fact that there are no dual-redundancy controls.

For businesses relying on in-store or in-person attendance and interaction or in public transport vehicles, vessels or aircraft, and passenger terminals, an incomplete solution affects the consumers’ confidence in your businesses’ ability to protect them while in your environment.

Hygiene Labs™ focuses explicitly on measures to strengthen controls against cross contamination.

It closes the loop and creates a protective shield to reduce or eliminate the risk of cross contamination significantly.

FAILURE TO REDUCE TRANSMISSION

Cost on Economy

Indian Government allocates more than $260 Billion each year to the public health sector to mitigate the transmission of infectious diseases.

Cost on Productivity

The cost of a single virus (bronchitis) is shown to be an average of $898USD to employers, per employee, per annum in lost productivity.

Public Perception

For businesses relying on in-store or in-person attendance and interaction, an incomplete safety solution affects the consumer’s confidence in your ability to protect them while in your environment.

Liability

With Occupational Health and Safety, risk management is at the forefront in workplaces. Businesses of today aspire to move forward, eliminate a series of redundancies, and imbibe control measures to weaken the future outbreaks.

Critical & Complex
Infrastructure

The risk to critical workers including defence, health, law, and order is greater than others. There is an increased risk of infection in enclosed and shared working environments. A particular concern for frontline and defense operations is the risk of mission-critical infrastructure experiencing depleted capability in an event of a contained outbreak.